14. Why Women are so Sick, with Sini Anderson

Sini Anderson, feminist activist and filmmaker

Sini Anderson:

A feminist filmmaker and activist, Sini was diagnosed with Lyme disease in 2010 during production of her documentary, The Punk Singer. After watching her dear friend, Kathleen Hanna, battle Lyme disease and then—in a weird plot twist— battling it herself, Sini knew her next film was going to be about Lyme disease. Research commenced. Subjects were found. Interviews began. And then Sini realized that Lyme disease is a symptom of a much bigger problem: Women’s health and the lack of gender equality in medicine. Join us as we discuss not only Lyme disease but the problem with healthcare and some of the reasons why women are … so sick.

Weekly Challenge:

Last week was so fun! I found so much comfort in my friends, and I hope you did, too!

This week is another emotional one: Take care of your inner-child! Love yourself full-time. In each moment, of each day, consider how you would treat yourself if you were a young, helpless child. (Would you feed him/her a healthy dinner, put her in the bath, and dress her in comfiest PJ’s, or would you beat her up for not feeling well and call her a loser?) A good trick is to put a picture of yourself up at a young age and remind yourself to treat yourself and tenderly as you would that kid. If you are new to inner-child work, please read my post HERE to get more information and inspiration. This stuff has seriously changed my life you guys! It has been the cornerstone to healing in so many ways. I can’t wait to hear about your progress and your findings.

Listen to this Episode if you are Especially Interested In:

  • Late-Stage Lyme Disease
  • Chronic Lyme Disease
  • Lyme disease facts
  • Women’s health
  • Why women are often disregarded in the medical community
  • Why Lyme and women’s health is so controversial

 

Resources Mentioned in this Episode:

Happy Listening! Let me know how your weekly challenge goes and share any insights xoxoxo

Share if you liked it:

12. Lyme disease and Braving Nature to Heal

Kate Rentz, director, photographer and adventurer

Kate Rentz:

Kate Rentz is a director and photographer living in Los Angeles, CA.  She’s enthusiastic about the outdoors, culture, travel, art, and human connection.  Kate was diagnosed with Lyme Disease in 2015 after suffering for 15+ years going undiagnosed. During those 15 years, Kate experienced extreme pain, insomnia, and brain fog which she complained about in countless doctor’s offices. The diagnoses came back varying: Endometriosis,  IBS, and the infamous, “it’s all in your head.” Kate Rentz found the majority of her healing in Flagyl, herbs, ozone therapy, AND the great outdoors.

IG: @katerentz

The Weekly Challenge:

This is new my friends so I hope you’re on board for some change! My podcasts are now due to come out on Mondays and with each episode I will be releasing a “weekly challenge.” But what IS  a weekly challenge!? It’s something for you to do each day of that week that will contribute to your healing. Remember: Do not beat yourself up, we are simply striving to do this, it is NOT about perfection. Also, please take the challenge and mold it to suit you. The best part (for me): I’m going to do it, too! So, hop on over to my Instagram @sheajackie and follow me to see IF I’m able to do it! Ready for this week’s challenge?

GO OUTSIDE. Each day, for at least twenty minutes, get yourself out. Whether that means sitting on your stoop and staring at a tree, going for a hike, walking around the block, or going skiing—I don’t care what or how. But get outside during the sunny hours and look at some nature. Your lawn? The bird up there? The clouds? Whatever. I’m going to be in NYC this week so it will be an extra challenge. Giddy-up.

Listen to this Episode if you are Especially Interested In:

  • Lyme disease
  • Holistic healing
  • Parasites and how to treat them
  • Listening to your own body and how it helps you heal
  • How to get outside when you’re totally exhausted
  • What to do when you have flare-ups
  • Resting when you hate resting
  • How nature can heal you

References Listed in This Episode:

Happy Listening!

SaveSave

SaveSave

Share if you liked it:

8. In Sickness and Health: How to Thrive Romantically

Me and Ian, March 2017

The Intimidating Combo of Romance and Illness:

Ian and I met immediately after my Lyme diagnosis, but it was another six or seven months before I got really sick. Suddenly all of the adventurous stuff we had bonded over was no longer accessible to me. I remember panicking with my rapid decline: How could I keep up a relationship with seemingly nothing to offer? Who would want me? Surely Ian would leave me soon enough. I didn’t have any of my old tricks to keep him around. But he didn’t leave. Beyond the obvious foundation of young love, there are reasons why we made it work. Work being the key word, unfortunately. It was hard, but it was worth it.

I get asked the question of “how to romance with extreme illness” a lot. So much so that when Eva Fisher and I started Wellness Companions, we were quick to add “Navigating Romance” to our service roster. Having both been in serious relationships within our (serious) illnesses, we knew the strategies that deeply served us and our partners. And, the good news is that many of our tactics were identical. While I always preach finding what works for you personally (and this area is no exception), I can say that I have found that some of the things mentioned in this episode have worked for multiple couples.

I’m quite passionate about the subject. I wrote about it over a year ago when I was getting faced with the judgmental question of how I could be OK with Ian doing an extended trip while I was in IVIG treatment. And I talk to friends and clients about it often. I decided to close out 2017 with this episode— with me and my partner, Ian Jewett, casually discussing what it was like for us to voyage through the worst and the surprising feelings that came up on the other side. I hope to leave you, as always, inspired and informed as the new year approaches and certainly new goals accompanying it. That being said, please share about your personal romantic experiences and your personal “tips” below if you’re so inclined. Also note that we were not able to cover close to everything in this episode and feel free to write with any questions.

Listen to this Episode if you are Especially Interested In:

  • Tips to thrive romantically from both me (the one sick) and Ian (the care-taker). It takes two!
  • Why illness did not derail our relationship
  • What a person from Lyme, Connecticut (yep, Ian is from there) thinks of Lyme disease
  • What happens when what you bond over initially is taken from you with illness
  • Bicilin intramuscular antibiotics
  • How to “be there” for someone when it’s all you feel you can do
  • How to take the pressure off of your relationship when you’re super sick
  • Why I’m grateful Ian didn’t make it his job to cure me
  • How to stay empowered
  • Different ways to make staying-in-bed-all-day fun!

 

Happy Listening and Happy Holidays!!!

 

Share if you liked it:

5. How to use Energy Healing to Get Well

Emily Wallace

Energy Healing

Have you wondered just what energy healing is? All of this “woo-woo” stuff gaining traction in 2017? (Especially here in Los Angeles.) Learn about shamanism, reiki, and other weird but magical things in this episode from two unlikely women.

Emily Wallace

“Once I committed to my emotional, mental, spiritual health that’s when I started to thrive” -Emily Wallace

Emily is a NYC based Intuitive Energy Healing Practitioner and Shamanic Reiki Master Teacher. After many years of battling chronic Lyme disease—visiting the hospital, bound to bed, not working, cared for at home by her parents—Emily found her way to 75% through antibiotics and various herbs and supplements. Desperate to do more than merely survive, Emily found energy healing. She was an unlikely client, poking fun at the whole thing. But, to her surprise, it worked. After surrendering to this modality she truly healed and stopped hearing from her symptoms. Today, Emily is thriving at 100% and, after getting certified at the Omega Institute, she has turned her good fortune into a passion for helping others using her own energy work. She is the founder of www.lightheartedhealingnyc.com

To book appointments with Emily, please see above link or visit her on social media @lightheartedhealingnyc

Listen to this episode if you are especially interested in:

  • Lyme disease
  • Herxing
  • How healing the emotional, physical, and spiritual helps us heal the physical
  • Holistic healing—using Western and Eastern modalities
  • What Shaminism is
  • What Reiki is
  • What Energy Healing is
  • Why it’s important to track your symptoms
  • How to love your Lyme away
  • Awesome self-care tricks
  • Love languages
  • More on how I quit coffee

Resources mentioned in episode:

Happy listening!

Share if you liked it:

Why I’m Matcha Obsessed

 

It’s all of the buzz right now: We are experiencing a bit of obnoxious “matcha madness” in Los Angeles,  and I’m joining in on the trend. But I’m hoping that as an ex-coffee junkie, my message is more palatable for the masses. Are you confused about what matcha is, WHY matcha is, and how the hell to make it? Allow me to explain..

(more…)

Share if you liked it:

3. Lyme Disease: How to Self-Care with a Demanding Job

Halley Feiffer

 

Lyme disease:

 

Halley Feiffer ignored her symptoms until they were drastically affecting her lifestyle. It was backstage in the middle of a performance, when she realized that she couldn’t rely on booking effortless jobs and she needed to go to the doctor. Through treating Lyme and strategically monitoring her self-care, today Halley manages a jam-packed schedule and demanding atmospheres. Find out how in this episode!

More about Halley:

Halley Feiffer is a bi-coastal actress and writer. Currently she is writing on “Kidding,” the upcoming Showtime series starring Jim Carrey. Halley was diagnosed with Lyme disease three years ago in New York City.

Listen to this episode if you are especially interested in:

  • How to keep working with your symptoms!
  • How to self-care with a demanding job
  • How to manage stress
  • Dr. Richard Horowitz
  • Antibiotics vs. holistic treatment
  • Lyme diet options

Happy listening!

Share if you liked it:

1. Lyme Disease: How to Get Properly Tested and Other Healing Gems

 

Jill Skibba

After two decades of harsh and debilitating symptoms, Jill Skibba finally got the Lyme testing she had been begging doctors for all along. The test came back lit up like a Christmas tree: Positive and then some. Find out what test was taken to get the reliable results, what Jill did/does to get better, and her amazing advice to fellow Lyme disease sufferers.

Jill Skibba is an aesthetician and microblading expert residing in Los Angeles. You can find her on Instagram @jill_skibba and you can read more about her journey with Lyme disease here.

 

Listen to this episode if you are especially interested in:

  • Lyme insomnia
  • Tips for traveling and adventure while sick
  • Lyme symptoms
  • California doctors
  • How to heal when your body rejects all natural solutions
  • How to be a good friend to people in the throes of illness

SaveSave

Share if you liked it:

The Curse of Knowing how Healthy Feels

pexels-photo.jpeg

I was observing my surroundings. How did I get here? I was lying on a flat table with one needle in my right arm and one in my left—the one in my right drawing dark, heavy, apathetic blood  from my sick body so it could pool in a machine where it got an expensive make-over,  the one in my left  feeding me an upgraded, strawberry-like vibrant blood. My dear friend sat next to me with a book she was reading aloud to keep me calm. Two innocent-faced,  pretty nurses that didn’t speak much English were nearby watching multiple patients. We were in Bali, Indonesia. My eyes grew fainter, my body more restless as though something inside of it was dying and fighting for life. The needles hurt, the treatment exhausted me,  I was afraid. Across from me was another woman receiving the same treatment but with no friend sitting at her bedside. How do you do this alone?  We struck up a conversation because it was weird to be receiving such an intimate treatment in the same room and not say a few words like, “hello. funny to see you here.” or something. As it turned out, we were both in the grips of Lyme disease.

(more…)

Share if you liked it:

Treating Anxiety, Part III: Lyme disease

treating-anxiety

“I just have a deep sense, a deep inner-knowing, that I am safe in this world now,” I told my mother one day in early 2013. It was true. For a girl who seriously suffered from panic attacks and PTSD, I had gotten so far in life.  I had worked through my issues very seriously, utilizing everything from medication to meditation, and it was all proving worth it.  Life’s anxiety inducing situations rarely spun me into a panic— deep down I could feel that the Universe was my ally, not my enemy. My risk-taking, fear-facing, and spirit-searching had left me with (what seemed like) an excess of emotional and physical freedom. And I attached to that freedom like it was my identity,  endlessly exploring my options, hopping the fences that said “no entry,”  and following my heart’s desire to go to the parts of the Earth that were untouched. I didn’t want to walk away from this life unscarred, untouched and inexperienced. In an effort to affirm this preconceived notion of myself, I took a camera man and  got my photos taken while rolling around in the dirt as an expression of my free-spirt. This attachment to identity and proving myself…it got me sick. How ironic that, in an attempt to solidify myself into one small box called “free-spirit,”  I got bit by a tick, I contracted Lyme disease from the tick,  and everything I thought I knew about myself violently unraveled.  It was terrifying. That “sense of safety” I had confidently chatted about to my mother months earlier was tested and, as it turns out, fear is a whole different beast when it’s NOT irrational. But it had to be faced and overcome because if I had acted from fear when it came to healing from Lyme disease, I would have died.

(more…)

Share if you liked it:

Fall Down, Get Up, Repeat.

img_8650

Ideally, I would wake up at 7 am everyday and immediately scoop a fresh wad of coconut oil into my mouth for fifteen minutes of oil pulling. After spitting out the freshly swirled toxins, I’d down 16 oz. of fresh celery juice. Then I’d use green tea to get my caffeine buzz on, journal, pray, and meditate. Around 8:30 am, I’d  start responding to emails and writing. I’d make my morning smoothie around 9:30, do more work, eventually get to a yoga class, make a raw salad for lunch, take an hour to rest, hit an infrared sauna or acupuncture, get some joyful activity in like socializing or dancing, and end my night with a healthy ,balanced meal, my necessary supplements, powdered magnesium, and red root tea. I’d then zap with my TENS machine and be in bed with a delicious story by 10 pm to read for thirty minutes before I passed out, benefitting from a solid 8 or 9 hours of perfect rest. IDEALLY. Sounds overwhelming right? So perfect it’s jarring. That’s why it’s an ideal. Because right now I’m sitting in this cafe writing and eating french fries. I woke up at a lagging 9:30 am,  oil pulled for ten semi-bearable minutes, drank coconut water, drank a couple of cups of coffee (instead of the more advantageous tea), responded to emails, made my smoothie by 11:30 am,and got out of the house— not to do yoga but to work. Also, I forgot my supplements at home. Eh, oh well.

I am imperfect. At everything. Including healing from Lyme disease. A shorter way to get the point across is to say, “I am human.” But I have found that statement to be ineffective; we need specific examples in order to actually believe that other people are just as human as we are. Or I do, anyway. I’ve always felt a little paranoid that I was missing some very important piece of information about this whole life thing— especially the whole healing from illness thing. Like other people had the rules—the user manual, the directions—and I didn’t. I would often get advice from other women—people who had previously suffered from Lyme—and I used their advice as an opportunity to beat myself up. Everyone was doing it better than me! “Your” diet was better than mine (or at least you were more disciplined about it), “you” were a better meditator, you saw the “right” doctors, took the “right” herbs, did the “right” research, spent money on the “right” things, you drank better water, had a better air purifier, did the “right” energy work, etc.  I thought I was bad at being sick (and “you were good at it??)  I cried every single day even though I knew it was harmful to my central nervous system. I cried every single day. And I thought maybe if I could just stop crying, I’d be doing it right.  I looked at people who seemed to hold it together—was that the right way, I wondered? I looked at people who worked serious jobs—was it a more serious job I needed? I looked at people who took two years off of work—did I need to take off? It was an endless mind-fuck. And now people are looking at me through sick eyes and wondering some of the same things: what does she do that I am not doing? She’s better at it than I am. I can’t be as disciplined as her. What’s her diet? Her protocol? on and on.. I’ve heard  you say these things and I’m here to tell you all about how I fuck up.

It’s important for me to write this as a wellness advocate— as a person who preaches a certain diet and lifestyle—to let you know, that I fall short a lot of the time. We cannot all be Kris Carr or Louise Hay. I hold myself to pretty high standards as you saw in my “ideal day.” Some practices have just become habit for me—no questions asked. And other practices—the ones that have less severe consequences— I have to work hard at. And some things, I’m just waiting on the willingness to carry out (like quitting coffee). The most important thing is that when I do fall off of the horse, I get back on. And that I get back on quickly. One of my dear friends once told me, “there’s only one rule. The rule is that you never, under any circumstance, beat yourself up.” That’s the rule I carry with me. It makes it much easier to get back up if I’m not whipping myself into a state of unrelenting weakness, forcing myself to stay down.

Two weeks ago, I was in Hawaii—my first vacation in three years. I took the vacation thing to heart. I ate all wrong, consuming more dairy and gluten than I’ve had in at least a year. I over did it physically, doing long hikes without shoes/water, and I didn’t get enough sleep. Oops. A few days after getting back to LA and trying to get back into my healthy groove, it was my birthday. Again, I bailed on my raw afternoon salad, I ate sweets that night, and instead of prayer and meditation, I spent the whole morning crying. Then it was Thanksgiving and, again, I “cheated” on my diet eating some extra desserts because… it’s the holidays!

It’s true. It’s a very hard time of year to eat a mostly-vegan, gluten-free diet. So, I fucked up a little. Every single day, I fuck up a little. Either I eat something a little off of the perfection I’m going for, I drink too much coffee, I forget to exercise or I don’t rest enough. It is challenging to fit it all into one day and have a job and live with any bit of flexibility. So, I don’t. But I do always wake up with the intention to try. I am always willing to get back on the horse when I fall off. My inner dialogue after whatever poor choice I made is something like this, Ok, that didn’t feel great. What’s next? Should I maybe consider doing it differently next time? Should I drink some detox tea or hit a yoga class? Or do something else that makes me feel good now? It’s OK. It happens.  If I don’t beat myself up then I have the space to compose a solution. So, let’s be real: you’re probably going to slip up this holiday season and abandon some of your custom self-care practices. What do you do then? Keep going, be kind to yourself, allow humanness and try again. And please know that all of us—all of us—are fucking up, too.

With fun and love,

Jackie

img_5326

Share if you liked it: